Zero six four eight three are you listening

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zero six four eight three are you listening is a story written by shukyou and illustrated by beili. It ran in Issue 47 and can be found at s2b2.livejournal.com/266919.html and shousetsubangbang.com/mirror/zero-six-four-eight-three-are-you-listening/.

Summary[edit]

What proceeds from the phrase 'sexy numbers stations'.

seven two six five one five zero three five two zero two one four one

seven two six five one five zero three five two zero two one four one
seven two six five one five zero three five two zero two one four one
seven two six five one five zero three five two zero two one four one
seven two six five one five zero three five two zero you one four one
seven two six five one five zero three five two zero you are four one
seven two six five one five zero three five two zero you are not one

seven two six five one five zero three five two zero you are not imagining this

Connections[edit]

This story is unconnected to other stories and universes.

Related Links[edit]

This story has no related links.

Gallery[edit]

Author's Notes[edit]

To be honest? I hate second person. To my mind, there are basically three times ever that second-person POV has been used successfully: Kelly Link's Travels With the Snow Queen, Soul Coughing's Screenwriter's Blues, and Welcome to Night Vale's A Story About You. It is in the spirit of the latter that this story was written, as in my quest to be a better person, I try to take writing tropes/tricks that I hate and do them myself; that way, if I'm going to judge, I might as well be judging myself.

Numbers stations scare the jeebers out of me. Like, they're kind of the most terrifying things I can think of. Now, fear is very subjective, and I know there are people reading this who think that's about the dumbest thing they've ever heard, but it's true. The Conet Project was indispensible in my research for this, and I'd say about 80% of the radio broadcasts in there come directly from real numbers stations transcripts; the others are either taken from popular songs or just random digits. I had a hell of a time working on it, too, because trying to write a story structured around something that scares me that badly while moving into an unfamiliar house? Yeah.

So this story was sort of a double-challenge: one, take a technical aspect I hate and make it work; and two, proceed forward from the improbable phrase 'sexy numbers stations'.


I'm sure that the people who hate this story aren't going to bother making their way all the way here, but if you do: believe me, I'm even more aware than you are that the story is weird and pretentious and full of anachronisms and completely messed-up in terms of internal chronology. It's completely odd and I don't care. If you feel like complaining, please direct your attention to this ten-year-old Penny Arcade cartoon.

All the gold stars and cute animals in the world go to beili, too, for a) not running screaming when I first presented her with the concept, b) embracing the utter madness, and c) turning out five gorgeous illustrations that couldn't have fit the tale better if they'd tried. And all so quickly, too, because even though I warned her about the possible existence of this story well in advance of things, I've spent the last two months of my life orchestrating a cross-country move, so I haven't exactly been what we call 'on the ball'. But she came through like a champ, and now my story is pretty in addition to being bizarre and alienating!


The last few paragraphs of this story, now that I think about it, are probably the result of my reading Ray Bradbury's 'No Particular Night or Morning' way too many times when I was a kid. Well, might as well steal from the best, right?


...Man, if I had the chops and a voice worth listening to, I'd get the Conet Project audio and do one hell of a podfic of this.

(from ladysisyphus.livejournal.com/862209.html)

External Reviews[edit]

  • pinboard.in: "odd and I don't really understand everything but it's extremely compelling and well-written and it's totally worth reading."