The Passion of Saints Tryphaena and Tryphosa

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The Passion of Saints Tryphaena and Tryphosa is a story written by shukyou and illustrated by tongari. It ran in Special Issue 2 and can be found at http://s2b2.livejournal.com/49071.html and http://www.shousetsubangbang.com/mirror/the-passion-of-saints-tryphaena-and-tryphosa/.

Summary[edit]

Early Christian women fall in love with one another.

From eccentric-nucleus.tumblr.com: "do you want some biblical lesbians b/c here are some biblical lesbians."

From pinboard.in: "MARTYRED LESBIANS FOR CHRIST! WHAT A LESBIAN THREESOME WOULD LOOK LIKE AS A BIBLICAL CHRONICLE. ALTHOUGH TO WARN YOU, IT DOES END WITH EVERYONE ACTUALFAX GETTING MARTYRED."

Translator's Notes

The author of The Passion of Saints Tryphaena and Tryphosa (part of a larger codex recently unearthed by Dr. Wm. Ford) identifies as 'Persis,' the third name listed with Tryphaena and Tryphosa in Romans 16:12. All three women are identified as leaders of the Roman church, though further biographies are absent elsewise from Christian writings. Nonetheless, St. Paul appeared to hold all three in high esteem, going so far as to identify them by context as διακονοι (diakonoi, deaconesses) who laborant/laboravit in Domino (labour/have laboured in the Lord).

The style used in the Passion lends credence to its unique authorial claims, as it bears little resemblence to later martyrdom accounts (see: The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas), choosing instead to focus its attention on the acts in life of the paired saints. In this, it bears more likeness to the apocryphal Acts of Paul and Thecla, which, despite the assertions its text makes, is a later forgery whose appearance coincides with the end of martyrdom accounts and the rise of hagiography. The author's intent appears to be to recount both life and death of her subjects, which lends credence to the text's claims that the author is an otherwise-uneducated, lower-class foreign woman in Roman society, for the mimesis the text evidence displays is interpretive, not verbatim (suggesting mimicry performed by someone who had possibly heard but never read similar accounts). The timeline does not follow precisely the dates suggested by other ancient texts, though precision of chronology was not a major concern of these authors.

The descriptions of sexual activity cannot, of course, be considered authentic, but must be understood as metaphorical, or perhaps a miscreant scribe's later addition to the text.

This story involves martyrdom, but like the early Christians, considers it a good thing.

Connections[edit]

The Passion of Saints Tryphaena and Tryphosa is involves characters mentioned in the Bible, and has a slight nod to Arizona Ford And The Golden Legend.

Author's Notes[edit]

My theory behind this was basically: hey, I've been exploiting all my friends and using everybody else's knowledge for evil! Maybe it's time to use my knowledge for evil! ...Except what I know is early Christian martyrdom texts. The translator's notes are very fake (I have implied that the codex was found by the hero of beeblebabe's ss*bb boy story), but they link to the real texts whose styles I'm trying to imitate here. If nothing else, I figure that'll let people know that this style is very intentional, and not just because I'm a bad writer.

I know I always say petronia's going to kick me out of the zine for this story, but this one may yet do it! Nah, it's not that bad, just really alienating. I won't be too surprised if no one reads it. FIRST-CENTURY PASTICHE, BITCHES! ...I may have to go lie down.[1]