La muerte y el jardín

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La muerte y el jardín is a story written by Ogiwara Saki and illustrated by beili. It ran in Issue 36 at http://s2b2.livejournal.com/212983.html, and is mirrored at http://www.shousetsubangbang.com/mirror/la-muerte-y-el-jardin/.

Summary[edit]

Set in Argentina in the mid 1970s, two subversives under the Perón regime are captured and executed - and then find themselves back in the land of the living, a year before they were captured.

A strange thing happened, something even he could not explain. His lips quirked up in a dry, cracked smile, and his tongue moved over his parched mouth. "For the glory of Argentina," he said, and he laughed.

The soldiers didn't like the laughter. They looked at him, and they saw that he was laughing at them, and their faces grew mottled with rage. How dare he! they said. How dare he, lowest of the low, laugh at their exalted positions! But as he laughed, there was the sound of another prisoner joining him, a man being brought into the compound at that very moment. The sound of the two men snickering echoed through the grey walls.

From isis.dreamwidth.org: "Vaguely based on a Borges story in which a man facing an execution squad asks God to stop time for one year, this story follows an Argentinian anti-government intellectual and agitator who, on the moment of his murder in prison in 1975, suddenly finds himself a year in the past. He tracks down the other man who was in the cell and befriends him and his family."

Author's Notes[edit]

External Reviews[edit]

  • http://secretsolitaire.livejournal.com/197598.html
  • shadow-birds.tumblr.com: "tw for violence, death. I called them the Argentinian version of Arthur and Eames, but they’re not really, except on a surface level. The story is gorgeous and will rip your heart out."
  • pinboard.in:
    Silvio Echevarria knows he is man destined to die - that is, until he wakes up one year earlier from his death-day.

    Interesting premise, and also I kind of love Luis Verdugo, who is an asshat. Bonus points to author for mentioning Borges and bringing back flashbacks of early-morning literature lessons in college, not necessarily bad ones.

    Also, read the author's notes, because I liked her "favorite version" of the ending.